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Fraud Attempts are on the Rise

Check Scams and "Spoofing" Attempts on the Rise

Financial institutions in Southwest and Central Ohio – including Wright-Patt Credit Union – have recently seen an increase in cases of check scams and “spoofing.”

Check Scams

At WPCU, we have seen a rise in check and money order scams, including the “Car Wrap Scam." If you receive unsolicited checks or money orders in the mail, especially any relating to Car Wrap Ads please contact our Member Help Center at (800) 762-0047 and report the fraudulent activity to the FTC. As reminder, do not share any personal or account information with an unknown company or person. For more informa​tion about this scam click here. ​

​"Spoofing"

"Spoofing" is when a fraudulent caller deliberately falsifies the information displayed on your caller ID to disguise his or her identity. Spoofing is often used as part of an attempt to trick someone into giving away valuable personal information so it can be used for fraudulent activity or sold illegally.

Answering a Call From Wright-Patt Credit Union

If you answer a call appearing on your Caller ID from Wright-Patt Credit Union and the phone number (937) 912-7000 (or any phone number for that matter), and the caller is seeking personal information such as account number, Social Security number, mother’s maiden name, passwords, debit/credit card numbers, PIN or CVV numbers, expiration dates, etc., hang up and call Wright-Patt Credit Union directly at (937) 912-7000 or (800) 762-0047 and use our phone navigation menu to reach our Member Help Center or the person/department who called you.

As a reminder, Wright-Patt Credit Union will never call or email asking you to provide us your personal or account information. However, in some cases, we may contact you asking to confirm recent transactions on your account to help identify potentially fraudulent activity.

Receiving a Voicemail from Wright-Patt Credit Union

If you receive a voicemail that displayed on your caller ID as Wright-Patt Credit Union and the phone number (937) 912-7000 or (800) 762-0047 (or any phone number for that matter), return the call to (937) 912-7000 or (800) 762-0047 (regardless of the number the caller asked you to call back) and go through the phone navigation menu to reach our Member Help Center or the person/department who called you. DO NOT call any other number provided by the caller.

For more helpful fraud prevention tips, click here.​

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Fraud Alert: Protect Your Economic Impact Payment

Scammers and identity thieves are trying to take advantage of those receiving a stimulus check.  The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent calls, texts, and emails coming from scammers pretending to be with the Social Security Administration, IRS, Census, USCIS and the FDIC. These fake government messages are telling people they are approved for quick relief payments or cash grants due to COVID-19.  Do not reply to these messages or requests for personal information, they are fraudulent.

Here are three more helpful tips to protect you and your hard-earned money from fraud.

  1. The IRS and other government agencies will never call asking for your Social Security Number (SSN) or banking information. Never provide your SSN or bank account information to anyone claiming to be from the IRS or another government agency.
  2. Be aware of emails, texts and phone calls from fraudsters claiming to be the IRS or another government agency. The IRS will never text, call or email you asking you to provide or verify your bank account information.
  3. You are not required to sign up or pay a fee to receive an Economic Impact Payment. Be on alert of scammers asking for payment or personal information in exchange for your stimulus check.

Learn more about the latest Economic Impact Payment and Coronavirus-related scams.

For more information about the Economic Impact Payments and how Wright-Patt Credit Union is here to help, click here.



​Don't Fall Victim to COVID-19 Scams

Many people are vulnerable right now as they experience financial concerns from job layoffs and reduced hours. Cybercriminals are using this time to create new email and phone scams promising extra money in an attempt to steal your personal information and your money.

Example of COVID-19 Email Scam

Scammers are claiming to be a bank or credit union employee offering free money to help their customers. To access the funds, the recipient is asked to provide their online banking credentials, ultimately giving scammers full access to their account.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: John Doe Member <YourEmail@email.com>
Date: Tue, Mar 24, 2020 at 3:15 PM
Subject: Re: My email
To: mark smith marksmith23@abcmail.com

Who gave you permission to change my email address??

On Tue, Mar 24, 2020 at 2:36 PM ​​mark smith <marksmith23@abcmail.com> wrote:

​I'm a banker.. with a credit union bank… due to the COVID-19 we are given out help to people to sustain there needs..

And avoid going out but stay at home..this money is free and we notice not all people knows about this but few citizens..

​​Government Relief Checks
Scammers are also contacting people saying they can help them get their government relief check early. This is not true!  Do not respond to texts or emails about relief checks from the federal government.

How do I stay protected from scams?

  • Be on the lookout for phishing emails that at first glance appear to come from a trusted source, yet after closer inspection, contain typos and use poor grammar. In addition, never click on unknown attachments, links or provide personal identifiable information via an unsecure website.
  • Be cautious of emails and phone calls offering unexpected or unprompted information or in which the sender/caller requests your personal information.
  • When searching for information about the COVID-19, only use reputable source​s su​ch as the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • If you receive an automated phone call, do not press any numbers, simply hang up. Scammers use illegal robocalls to try and obtain your personal information.

As a reminder, if you suspect any fraudulent activity, please contact our Member Help Center at (800) 762-0047 and report the activity to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) as soon as possible.



COVID-19 Relief Scams Awareness

With the increasing impact of coronavirus (COVID-19) on our communities, there have been reports that the U.S. government will soon be sending relief funds by check or direct deposit. It is important to understand that the details of such a relief program are still being worked out. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) predicts scammers are starting to take advantage of this.

Please remember:

  1. The U.S. government will not ask you to pay anything up front to receive funds – no fees, no charges.
  2. The U.S. government will not call to ask for your Social Security number, bank account or credit card number.
  3. This program is not yet approved. Anyone telling you they can get you money now is trying to scam you.

If you suspect a scam, please contact the FTC at www.ftc.gov/complaint.

To keep up to date with the latest Coronavirus-related scams please visit www.ftc.gov/coronavirus.



Cybercriminals are Taking Advantage of the Rising Concerns about the Coronavirus

With the increasing concerns regarding COVID-19, or the coronavirus, cybercriminals using this time to create scams and attempt to steal your personal information or infect your devices with harmful malware.

For example, there has been a recent report of a fraudulent email that appeared to be from the CDC Health Alert Network claiming to provide a list of local cases. To access the list, recipients were instructed to click on a link in the email and then input personal information.

How Do I Stay Protected?

  1. When searching for information about the coronavirus only use reputable sources such as the U.S. Center for Disease Control or the World Health Organization.
  2. Be on the lookout for phishing emails that at first glance appear to come from a trusted source. Never click on unknown attachments, links or provide personal identifiable information via an unsecure website.
  3. Be cautious of emails and phone calls offering unexpected or unprompted information or in which the sender/callers requests your personal information.
  4. Not all advertisements are created equal. Social media companies are cracking down on ads spreading coronavirus rumors, however, some false ads may make it through their filters. It's best to find information on the disease from official sources like the U.S. Center for Disease Control or the World Health Organization.

As a reminder, if you suspect any fraudulent activity, please contact our Member Help Center at (800) 762-0047 and report the activity to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) as soon as possible.​